physicsphysics
physicsphysics:

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Just Found Water in Martian Soil
Just when you thought ol’ Curiosity was digging in for the winter, the little discovery machine came up with a doozy: It discovered water in Martian soil. NASA scientists just published five papers in Science detailing the experiments that led to the discovery. That’s right. There’s water on Mars.

physicsphysics:

NASA’s Curiosity Rover Just Found Water in Martian Soil

Just when you thought ol’ Curiosity was digging in for the winter, the little discovery machine came up with a doozy: It discovered water in Martian soil. NASA scientists just published five papers in Science detailing the experiments that led to the discovery. That’s right. There’s water on Mars.

thescienceofreality
fuckyeahcells:

Happy Birthday, Rosalind Franklin.
"You look at science (or at least talk of it) as some sort of demoralising invention of man, something apart from real life, and which must be cautiously guarded and kept separate from everyday existence. But science and everyday life cannot and should not be separated. Science, for me, gives a partial explanation of life. In so far as it goes, it is based on fact, experience and experiment… In my view, all that is necessary for faith is the belief that by doing our best we shall come nearer to success and that success in our aims (the improvement of the lot of mankind, present and future) is worth attaining." -R.F. (a letter addressed to her religious father)

fuckyeahcells:

Happy Birthday, Rosalind Franklin.

"You look at science (or at least talk of it) as some sort of demoralising invention of man, something apart from real life, and which must be cautiously guarded and kept separate from everyday existence. But science and everyday life cannot and should not be separated. Science, for me, gives a partial explanation of life. In so far as it goes, it is based on fact, experience and experiment… In my view, all that is necessary for faith is the belief that by doing our best we shall come nearer to success and that success in our aims (the improvement of the lot of mankind, present and future) is worth attaining."

-R.F. (a letter addressed to her religious father)

illbedancinginskeletonhell

Antique Victorian Microscope Slides
In the Victorian era, even something as simple as a slide for a microscope is beautifully illustrated with colored delicate floral designs and detailed patterns. The latter generations seem to have lost certain elements of style, design and attention to detail, whether industrial or personal, that were commonplace in the 19th century and prior. These are incredible.

Antique Victorian Microscope Slides

In the Victorian era, even something as simple as a slide for a microscope is beautifully illustrated with colored delicate floral designs and detailed patterns. The latter generations seem to have lost certain elements of style, design and attention to detail, whether industrial or personal, that were commonplace in the 19th century and prior. These are incredible.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics
fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The regular hexagonal structure of honeycomb may owe more to fluid dynamics than the careful engineering of the bees that build it. Observations indicate that honeycomb cells start out circular and become hexagonal as the bees continue building. Both experiments and models show that an array of circular cells can transform into hexagons due to surface tension driving flow at the junctions where the three cell walls meet. But for the wax to flow, it has to be warm—about 45 degrees Celsius compared to the hive’s ambient temperature of 25 degrees. The researchers suggest that the worker bees constructing the comb knead and heat the wax with their bodies until it’s able to flow and form the hexagons. (Photo credit: G. Mackintosh; via Nature and B. L. Karihaloo et al.)

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

The regular hexagonal structure of honeycomb may owe more to fluid dynamics than the careful engineering of the bees that build it. Observations indicate that honeycomb cells start out circular and become hexagonal as the bees continue building. Both experiments and models show that an array of circular cells can transform into hexagons due to surface tension driving flow at the junctions where the three cell walls meet. But for the wax to flow, it has to be warm—about 45 degrees Celsius compared to the hive’s ambient temperature of 25 degrees. The researchers suggest that the worker bees constructing the comb knead and heat the wax with their bodies until it’s able to flow and form the hexagons. (Photo credit: G. Mackintosh; via Nature and B. L. Karihaloo et al.)

scinerds

scinerds:

Slow Science

When we think of scientific experimentation, often we think of discrete experiments or projects that take place over a relatively short time span. When it comes to long-running experiments, many people would assume that they would take few decades to run from start-to finish, at most. As it turns out, that time frame is short in duration when compared to five of science’s longest running projects, some of which have run over centuries, changing hands along the way.  Nature documents the five longest running experiments:

400 years: Counting Spots -  Astronomers have been counting sunspots since Galileo’s time, and the analysis of sunspot patterns has been an ongoing experiment over the past 4 centuries, yielding some interesting insights regarding sunspots cyclical nature.  Ultimately, science has accumulated some value data used for the prediction of sunspot activity. 

170 years: Monitoring an irritable giant - Mount Vesuvius erupts with regularity in every thousand years. Analysis of past patterns allows scientists to predict volcanic activity and protect the public, as they did in 1944 when landslides around the crater raised clouds of ash-dust

170 years: Harvesting data - In 2008 scientist Andy McDonald inherited agricultural experiment data that documented the effects of fertilizers on crop production since 1843. The unbroken chain of data is invaluable  and aids in the study of environmental and biological trends that only become apparent over long periods of time.

90 years: Watching genius blossom - In 1921, Lewis Sterman started tracking 1500 gifted children, with the goal of proving that gifted children were well rounded, and not the socially inept individuals that gifted children were publicly perceived as. The in-depth record of their development was maintained over ninety years, and the children were just as well adjusted as the general population.  Valuable data regarding psychology and childhood development was gained over the 90 years of the experiment. 

85 years: Waiting for the drop - This experiment was originally set up as a demonstration for university students at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, Australia, in 1961. The goal was to monitor the rate of flow of liquid pitch - a viscous tar-based - through a funnel. The experiment determined that one drop falls into the container below at a rate of 1 drop every 6-12 years. The 9th drop is expected to fall toward the end of 2013.

More details regarding the experiments may be found @nature.

scientificillustration

brain-smudge:

1. Stegosaurus stenops
2. Tarbosaurus bataar and Gallimimus bullatus

The great tyrannosaur Tarbosaurus bataar is about to chomp down on the great orithomimid Gallimimus bullatus. Gallimimus was about the size of a horse, and Tarbosaurus in this scene is a subadult, not quite full sized. The scene is Late Cretaceous Mongolia during the dry season, when the Plane Trees have dropped their leaves.
3. Triceratops.
4. Tyrannosaurus Rex
5. Styracosaurus albertensis
6. Gorgosaurus libratu
Has anyone seen my teef? Enough lip from you sonny, I’f got enough of that already. Gorgosaurus libratus (formerly known as Albertosaurus libratus, formerly known as Gorgosaurus libratus) was a large tyrannosaur that lived in North America during the Late Cretaceous, about 75 million years ago.
7. Dimetrodon grandis
The grand Dimetrodon looking as fearsome as it no doubt was. Dimetrodon lived an awfully long time ago, in the early Permian, about 280,000,000 years ago.

thescienceofreality

razorshapes:

Nikki Graziano

Found Functions

“Nevertheless, the fact is that there is nothing as dreamy and poetic, nothing as radical, subversive, and psychedelic, as mathematics. It is every bit as mind blowing as cosmology or physics… and allows more freedom of expression than poetry, art, or music… Mathematics is the purest of the arts, as well as the most misunderstood.” - Paul Lockhart